5 Short List Winners of the 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition, Library for all, Writing for Children Category

Children’s writing is a specialised kind of literature. Generally, for children’s literature in PNG, our PNG culture has the same stories told to adults as well as children. The same messages are passed on through legends, tales, fables, comedy, parody, satire and spoof to all ages. However, in modern literature, there are some significant differences. Basically, the writing for children portions out the central ideas and bring out just one tiny aspect of a larger thought or concept in a story or illustration as a literature piece. The idea of love or kindness for example, can possibly be expressed in many many short stories, breaking up the central theme or concept into bits and pieces. This helps to build the required building blocks for the bigger or larger concept for the child as they develop their personalities. The central element of writing for children (more like an unstated golden rule) is that illustrations have to be part of the writing. Our entries for the 2017, Crocodile Prize Competition illustrates a need for PNG writers to embrace illustrations in their art. This year’s entries could also benefit from a writing workshop or coaching specializing in writing for children. Otherwise, the entries this year, small in numbers came from a diverse background. The winner of the year, 2016 Crocodile Prize Competition, Abt and Assiociate, Emerging Young writers, Mr Peter Jokisie sent in the winning entry piece. Who would have thought Peter Jokisie could win the Writing for Children Category, when he wrote about drugs and adult themes with sophistication and deliciously arranged words.

The ‘Library for all’ an NGO from Australia, came on board to support the Crocodile Prize to create more publicity to and sponsored the Prize for the Writing for Children Category.

Below are the short list winners of the 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition, Library for all, Writing for Children Category.

 Hunting Trip by Leila Parina

 Charlotte and the Shiny Crocodile by Peter Jokisie

 Bruno satisfied his hunger for meat by Charlene Nii

 Snoopy the Lost Puppy by Jordan Dean

 The Collapsed Mess Table by Jimmy Awagl

Hunting Trip by Leila Parina
Leilah says she is not an outgoing person. She prefers to spend time alone or with those who are close to her. She loves reading, writing, sketching, and dancing. Leila is happy to Volunteer her time with worthwhile projects.

Leilah has been writing since she was 9 years old (mostly in her personal journals/diaries) but her first published work was just out in 2017. A piece called ‘A paradigm shift’ was featured in the PNG anthology ‘My walk to Equality’. Leilah has written poems, short stories and essays.

Charlotte and the Shiny Crocodile by Peter Jokisie
Peter is a Safety Supervisor with the, Dulux Group LTD
Peter and is from Morobe and lives in Lae. He enjoys reading and writing in the following genres: thrillers, fantasy, horror and science fiction.

He has been writing for seven years. Peter writes under my pseudonym of J.P. Richard. Some his work has been published in the Crocodile Prize Anthologies of 2012, 2014 and 2016. He won the award for the 2016 Crocodile Prize Competition, Abt and Associates, Emerging Young Writer Award.

Bruno satisfied his hunger for meat by Charlene Nii
Charlene works in Sales. She is inspired by her father Francis Nii who is an established Author in PNG. Charlene plans to continue writing.

Snoopy the Lost Puppy by Jordan Dean
Jordan Dean works as a Director (until confirmed) of Grants Management Organisation in Port Moresby, NCD. He has been writing as a hobby for over a decade. Several of his poems and short stories have been published on international sites and magazines including: Power Poetry, Dissident Voice Magazine, Creative Talents Unleashed, Tuck Magazine, Micro Poetry, Story Write, Spill Words Literary Press and PNG Attitude. Jordan has published 4 books: ‘Tattooed Face: A collection of Poems’ (2016), ‘Follow the Rainbow: Selected Poems’ (2016), ‘Stranger in Paradise & other Short Stories’ (2016) and ‘Silent Thoughts: Exploring Poetry’’ (2017). These books are available on Amazon.

The Collapsed Mess Table by Jimmy Awagl
Jimmy is a secondary school teacher. He is the founder & vice president of Simbu Writers Association. He regularly contributes to the PNG Attitude Blogg. He writes as a hobby apart from classroom teaching. Jimmy has authored four books so far. He plans to write and publish more books.

Short list of the 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition, Minerals Resources Development Corporation, Women in Writing Category

Five Women in Writing shortlisted for the 2017 Minerals Resources Development Corperations Women in Writing Award

The 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition experienced a stronger women movement in Writing. There were more women than men (55 % of total entries) submitting literary entry. Women had better quality writing and were superior in their choice of topics and ideas. A proper assessment on the entries could possibly illustrate more about the contribution in literature from the entirs.

This category is obviously meant to promote equity. Its an opportunity for women to have a larger space to showcase their talents gifts and abilities. The trend has been nothing but positive. The wave of talents have been strong. The following names of women listed below is the short list winners for this category.

 Kepan Kepas Winuan
 Evah Kuamin Banige
 Leila Parina
 Carol Kouron
 Kirsten Aria

The shortlisted literary entries above have been sent to the sponsors who have picked the overall winner. The overall winner will be announced at the Awards Reception event on the 22nd February 2018, here in Port Moresby. The brief biographies below illustrate a little bit more about the shortlisted authors.

Kepan Kepas Winuan

Kepan Kepas Winuan is a Teacher at the Kudjip Nazarene High School, Kudjip Nazarene Station, Jiwaka Province.

Kepan is currently working on publishing two books and a school magazine. These literary materials are; Book of Synonyms, Developing Writing Skills and School Journal.

Her first book (Book of Homonyms) has been completed. She is now negotiating with Notion Press Publishing Company of India to have it published.

Evah Kuamin Banige

Evah Kuamin Banige is an Administration Officer in Lae, Morobe Province.
She is passionate about writing, helping children and advocating for change and development in her community. She wrote: ‘Victims of violence have to rise up and speak out for their own good. I believe I have taken the biggest step to write about my experiences as a woman facing violence through this competition’

She has been writing since her primary school days. She won a prize for the story of her experience of the 1994 Twin Volcanic Eruptions which was published in book of collection of short stories. Part of 4th Year Journalism Thesis was published in the South Pacific Islands Journalism Communication. One of her entry won the 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) Best Award in the Print Category of the PNG Media Awards.

Kirsten Aria

Kirsten is from Ihu in the Gulf Province. She enjoys literature. Kirsten entered an entry in 2012 under the Heritage category. The Heritage category entry in that year was aired by EmTV as content in a program focussed on Gulf Province of Papua New Guinea.

Leila Parina

Leila wrote a candid and beautifully stringed words into a poetry about violence. Leila has been writing since at the age of 9. She mostly wrote in her private journals. Her first published work was out in 2017. It is called “A paradigm shift” which was featured in the PNG Anthology “My walk to Equality”.

Five entries shortlisted for the 2017 Crocodile Prize Chamber of Mines and Petroleum, Essays and Journalism Award

The 2017 Crocodile Prize Essays and Journalism Category received a collection of interesting topics that were written about and sent in. The topics varied greatly. Predictably, a good number of the entries were about Politics, Corruption, Power and Leadership. 2017 was the year of the Papua New Guinea National Elections and so the number of entries talking about this illustrated this. Congratulations to the 5 entries that were shortlisted for the 2017 Crocodile Prize, PNG Chamber of Mines and Petroleum, Essays and Journalism Category. The shortlisted entrants of the competition come with diverse backgrounds and experiences. Listed below are the titles and the names of entrants considered as winners.

 The Murder by Kepan Kepas Winuan
 The Positive Side of Men by Michael Geketa
 Lack of Readers and Buyers in Papua New Guinea by Jordan Dean
 Her Fight by Evah Kuamin Banige
 Doctors without Medical Borders by William Tau -Vali

The shortlisted literary entries above have been sent to the sponsors who have picked the overall winner. The overall winner will be announced at the Awards Reception event on the 17th February 2018, here in Port Moresby. The brief biographies below illustrate a little bit more about the shortlisted authors.

The Murder by Kepan Kepas Winuan

Kepan Kepas Winuan is a Teacher at the Kudjip Nazarene High School, Kudjip Nazarene Station, Jiwaka Province.

Kepan is currently working on publishing two books and a school magazine. These literary materials are; Book of Synonyms, Developing Writing Skills and School Journal.

Her first book (Book of Homonyms) has been completed. She is now negotiating with Notion Press Publishing Company of India to have it published.

The Positive Side of Men by Michael Geketa

Michael Geketa is employed in the informal economy in Port Moresby, National Capital District, after serving in the Royal Police Constabulary for much of his life. He used to contribute his written work to Kokomo Magazine at Kerevat National High School in 1989 as a student. He also contributed poems to the Weekly Writers Column poetry corner of the National Newspaper since 2009. The 2014 and 2015 Crocodile Prize Anthology included his work, four Poems and two Essays. He has started writing a book of poems and short story. Work has also began for a framework of his biography titled: Thun der over Parkinson Ranges

Lack of Readers and Buyers in Papua New Guinea by Jordan Dean

Jordan Dean works as a Director (until confirmed) of Grants Management Organisation in Port Moresby, NCD. He has been writing as a hobby for over a decade. Several of his poems and short stories have been published on international sites and magazines including: Power Poetry, Dissident Voice Magazine, Creative Talents Unleashed, Tuck Magazine, Micro Poetry, Story Write, Spill Words Literary Press and PNG Attitude.

Jordan has published 4 books: ‘Tattooed Face: A collection of Poems’ (2016), ‘Follow the Rainbow: Selected Poems’ (2016)), ‘Stranger in Paradise & other Short Stories’ (2016)) and ‘Silent Thoughts: Exploring Poetry’’ (2017)). These books are available on Amazon.

Her Fight by Evah Kuamin Banige

Evah Kuamin Banige is an Administration Officer in Lae, Morobe Province.
She is passionate about writing, helping children and advocating for change and development in her community. She wrote: ‘Victims of violence have to rise up and speak out for their own good. I believe I have taken the biggest step to write about my experiences as a woman facing violence through this competition’

She has been writing since her primary school days. She won a prize for the story of her experience of the 1994 Twin Volcanic Eruptions which was published in book of collection of short stories. Part of 4th Year Journalism Thesis was published in the South Pacific Islands Journalism Communication. One of her entry won the 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) Best Award in the Print Category of the PNG Media Awards.

Doctors Without Medical Borders by William Tau -Vali

William Tau-Vali
is a retired public servant who resides at his Motuan Village of Gaire, Central Province. His background is in computing. That’s the area he studied at University but he would like to think of himself these days as an emerging writer. This is his first written work, together with the other two pieces he submitted earlier in the 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition.

Judged 5 Best Poetry Entry for 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition

The following titles below are the 5 winners of the 2017 Crocodile Prize Kina Securities Poetry Category.

The short list of the winning entries came from a long process of filing, culling and judging. Only one more process is left, that is: Selection of the overall winner among the 5 winners as identified by the judges.

The winners for the 2017 Crocodile Prize Kina Securities Poetry Category are the following entries:
Broken and beaten by Leila Parina
He is gagged by Emmanuel Marosi
We need change by Annie Dori
When tomorrow come by Leiao Gerega
Who will by Leiao Gerega

Leila Parina wrote a candid and beautifully stringed group of words into a poetry illustrating violence by those who supposed to love. Leila has been writing since she was 9 years old. She mostly wrote in her private journals. Her first published work was out in 2017. It is called “A paradigm shift” which was featured in the PNG Anthology “My walk to Equality”.

Emmanuel Marosi put together firm and strong verses which was dedicated to Martyn Namorong, a Papua New Guinean Blogger and Anti-Corruption Activist. This was when members of public took to supporting Martyn during the Tomato Head saga. Emmanuel has published several articles on the internet, on blogs and other sites like hub pages. He has been writing since 2012. He is an electrical communications engineer.

Annie Dori weaves together a rather grim scene of situations in PNG that shows societies moving toward destitute and annihilation. The poem therefore calls for change. Annie is currently under the Ok Tedi’s Graduate Program as an Occupational Nursing Officer. She loves working with communities and is passionate about Humanitarian work. She only keeps entries in her private journal. She would not consider herself as a writer or a poet.

Leiao Gerega eloquently paints a crude and bleak world we live in, in the poem ‘Who will’. The question is who will. Her other poem speaks of violence in the most animated and colourful language. Two of her entries were selected by the Judge. Leiao is reporter with South Pacific Post Courier. She loves reading, writing short stories and poems. The shortlisted entry for this year and other poems have always been dedicated her my mother. She started writing as a 10-year-old. Her writings were mostly kept in her diaries. Her first ever published work of two poems are featured in the PNG women’s first Anthology ‘My Walk to Equality’.

Attitude: Where do we go?

This is an entry for the 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition, Illustration Category by Salvatore Tonou Brere. Salvatore lives in Port Moresby. He is an illustrator and cartoonist.  He works for the South Pacific Post.  Salvatore plans to write Children’s Books. One of his works has been featured in the ‘Traditional Salt Making of Chimbu’

 

How To Write A Poem

HOW  TO  WRITE  A  POEM – Chips Mackellar

The first task is to plan what you want to say.

For example, suppose you wanted to decide if your old uncle is too old to do something.  Would he be too old because he has grey hair? No, because lots of people have grey hair and can do things. What about if he has bad teeth? No, because lots of people have bad teeth but can still do things. So what would make him too old?  Well he would be too old if he thought he could do something then found that he was too old to do it.

So you could put your plan into verse, like this:

He’s not too old when his hair turns grey,

He’s not too old when his teeth decay.

But he’s well on his way to his last long sleep,

When his mind makes a date which his body can’t keep.

The essence of a good poem is if its end of lines rhyme, and the lines which rhyme have the same number of syllables. So, analyse the poem, to see if it rhymes, and count the number of syllables per line.

Total

Syllables

Per line

|

Line                      Number the  syllables per line

 

  1. He’s / not/ too/ old/ when / his / hair/ turns/ grey.
  • 2     3     4      5        6       7      8         9                                       total: 9

 

  1. He’s / not / too/ old / when / his/  teeth / de/
  • 2       3      4        5          6        7     8     9                                             total; 9

 

  1. But /  he’s /  well /  on  /  his  /  way  /  to  /  his / last /  long / sleep,

1      2       3         4        5        6        7       8      9       10       11                   total: 11

 

  1. When /  his /  mind /  makes / a /  date /  which /  his /  body/  can’t/  keep

1          2       3           4        5      6          7         8       9          10       11.    total: 11

 

So you can see that the end of lines 1 and 2 rhyme (grey with decay) and the end of lines 3 and 4 rhyme (sleep with keep) and the rhyming lines have the same number of syllables.

In this example each word has only one syllable except in Line 2 where “decay” has two syllables thus: “de / cay.”

Easy. Isn’t it?

                                                                                                                 Chips Mackellar enjoys writing poetry and has volunteered to help Papua New Guinean who wish to improve their poetry.

[ Note: The poem here is an old maxim of uncertain origin, used here as an example of how to turn prose into poetry]

Poems from Emily that Chips made some suggestions to and as requested by Emily. (Emily’s original unedited poems have been entered in Crocodile Prize 2016).

GLAMOUROUSLY COLOURFUL  1.

Wings so big and feathers so bright,

With plumes outstretched to my delight,

King of birds and colourful too,

Glamourous and bold, we all love you.

Papua New Guinea’s symbolic device,

Our beautiful Bird of Paradise.

STAR SO BRIGHT   2.

Grant me my wish oh star so bright,

In peace and harmony tonight,

That I may not perish in thy sight,

But live and flourish with delight.

A LOVER’S WISH   3.

If our moon should ever fade away,

And the sun dies out and dark our day,

I wish our love be bold and grand,

And linger long in another land,

And never ever fail or stall,

Even if the stars should fall.

Crocodile Prize Competition

This post is for all PNG writers intending to enter the 2016 Crocodile Prize. PLEASE READ CAREFULLY.

If you want to take part in the Crocodile Prize this year, you have to visit this blog, http://www.crocodileprize.com or http://www.crocodileprize.org and read as much information as you can. When you decide to enter one of the seven Crocodile Prize 2016 categories, you must label your writing clearly so the entry does not get lost or mixed up with others. Most of the entries the committee has received so far do not even have the writer’s name on the entry itself. Having your name written on the email does not get it on your entry. Some entries do not even have categories they are being entered into.

To assist future submissions, please follow the instructions below carefully and follow the example to submit your entry.

  1. The most important thing to do is to write your title, your full name and category next to that title on the actual entry. You must also attach a copy of the entry form with your full details. The entry forms are on the two websites: www.crocodile prize.com and http://www.crocodile prize.org. The entry form can be downloaded or copied and pasted. Here is an example of how you should submit an entry.

EXAMPLE ENTRY

Poetry Entry Crocodile Prize – by Joycelin Leahy©

New Love

A mess of feelings

Soft strings twisted, and tangled

Intoxication

A lore to be unfold soon

Waiting, yearning the unknown

Once for-warned heart dazed

Consumed in immense chaos

Riddled with beauty

Warmed and rendered with lightness

EXAMPLE ENTRY FORM

CROCODILE PRIZE 2016 ENTRY FORM

*** MUST BE COMPLETED AND EMAILED TO crocprize@gmail.com WITHIN 48 HOURS OF SUBMITTING ENTRY ***

NAME: Joycelin Leahy

DATE OF BIRTH:16/03/1965

PLACE OF BIRTH (town/village): I am from Wagang Village, Morobe province. I was born in Wau, Morobe Province.

OCCUPATION: Writer/Artist/Storyteller

TITLE OF WRITTEN/ILLUSTRATION ITEM: (as my submission above)

New Love

CATEGORY:

Poetry

WORD COUNT:

38 words

BRIEF BIO (please write a few sentences to introduce yourself to the Crocodile Organising Committee 2016)

I am a Papua New Guinean writer with specific interests in short stories, children’s stories and creative non-fiction (such as memoirs). I write and read daily. I was a trained journalist and later worked in PR, marketing, business development and small business. To improve my writing skills, I like working with other writers and enjoy setting up daily challenges for myself to write short stories with certain plots in limited number of words. Sometimes I would read this to my family and friends and see how they react to the story. I also attend a weekly creative writing workshop with other writers to share and learn about storytelling. I find the best stories I write come from free-writing. Free-writing is when you set up a time (e.g. say for five minutes) I focus, let everything go, and just write down whatever that comes to my mind. Then, I expand, re-write and develop the plot.

WRITING EXPERIENCE ( how long have you been writing? have you written any published books, magazine articles, academic journal articles etc? do you have a Blog – if yes, title?)

I have been writing for over 30 years. I have published short stories and won the Crocodile Prize 2015 Writing for Children category. I also wrote for PNG newspapers and the Paradise Magazine and consultation reports. (Email me on joycelinleahy@gmail.com for specifics).

Submit all entries to crocprize@gmail.com

 

The Witch Hunt – Poetry

A poem by llyana Garap

witch_photo_1
Enter a caption

Courtesy Tom Lee via Flickr / Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/qW8iEj

 

Witch Hunt

 

Please stop!

You’re hurting me, please stop I cried

I’m sorry that your brother died.

Your brother was my son, you see,

So stop this pain. You’re hurting me.

I’m sorry that your father died,

He was my husband, at my side.

He was so old, he could not walk,

He even found it hard to talk.

I’m sorry that your daughter died.

In God’s own hand she’ll now abide.

She was my grandchild, dear to me,

I would not harm her, don’t you see.

I did not kill them, that is true.

Please ask God, and he’ll tell you.

You come into my kunai house,

And drag me out, as cat drags mouse,

You burn me with an iron so hot,

Took all the strength that I have got.

You cut my skin with sharpened knife

You’ve tried so hard to end my life.

You destroy my house, which is my home.

I’m doomed forever, now to roam.

I’m not sanguma, pointing bone,

Please go now. Leave me alone!!!!!!

 

This is another example of a writer’s poem that has been assisted by Chips. If you need some help with yours, please send your work to crocprize@gmail.com

We also would like to publish some stories, poems and photographs associated with literature in PNG. All contributions will be considered with feedback for the writer.

 

PNG Poets Can Get Help

Picture1
Chips Mackellar

Papua New Guinean poets intending on brushing up their poetry for the Crocodile Prize can get help from Australian poet Malcolm Mackellar or Chips as he is known to friends.

Chips has offered to look at your poems and offer suggestions to improve the rhyme and metre.

“My reason for asking to help PNG poets, is to encourage them to write better poetry. Whilst PNG poets are to be praised for their work, unfortunately the so called poems I have seen in lack rhyme and metre. Not surprising as I suppose no one has showed them how”, Chips said.

After completing his education in Australia, Chips served in Papua New Guinea from 1953 to 1981.

He started as a patrol officer, then Assistant District Commissioner, and finally District Court Magistrate. His postings included; Western District, Western Highlands, Madang, Milne Bay, Morobe, Enga and his final posting was as District Court Magistrate, Ela Beach Court House, Port Moresby. Chips speaks English, Pidgin, Police Motu, and Indonesian Bahasa.

The Committee 2016 is proud to have Chips on board to assist PNG poets. Please send your poems to crocprize@gmail.com and the selected poems will be posted here with some advice from Chips.  Here is one of Malcolm Mackellar’s own poems.

The Patrol Post in the Sky ©Malcolm Mackellar
There’s a Patrol Post in the sky, above the sea near Lae,
Nor’nor West of Samarai, South-East of Hansa Bay.
It has palm trees waving in the moon, where mosquitoes sting at night,
And canoes out on the blue lagoon, awaiting fish to bite.
It smells of kunai in the rain, and smoke from the valley floor,
And you’ll hear the pounding surf again, on the reef beyond the shore.

It’s the place where all the kiaps go, when their life on earth is through,
And they talk with all the friends they know, of the things they used to do.
They talk of all the times now past, and of places far away,
And of all the memories that last, of Independence Day.
They talk of sights and sounds and smells, and people they all knew,
Of bugle calls and mission bells, of garamut and kundu.

Of days gone by in Samarai, and windswept coral cays,
Of tribal fight and freezing nights, and misty Highland days,
Of black-palm floors and tidal bores, and life on the River Fly,
The Kavieng Club and the bottom pub, with a thirst you couldn’t buy,
Of Highland roads and carrier loads, at the time when we were there,
Of bailer-shell pearls and Trobriand girls, with flowers in their hair.

And when we say good bye to you, don’t mourn us when we go,
For the Big DC will call us too, and this of course we know.
That last patrol will take us all, along that well worn track,
But the difference with this final call, is that we won’t be coming back.
And our parting should not cause you pain, it’s not sad for us to die,
For we shall all soon meet again, in that Patrol Post in the Sky..

Top Five Tips on Publishing a Children’s Book

I had posted this on another blog and many readers found it most helpful. I write children’s stories myself and these tips are more for a novel than a picture book, but the general guidelines apply in both cases.

Tribalmystic stories

There are a lot of tips on what you need to do when you have a book ready to publish. Here are top five tips on publishing for children.

The man himself, Barry Cunningham, the original publisher of Harry Porter and the Publisher of Chicken House gives a little advice to aspiring writers for children’s books,  ranging from age 7-18.

Personally, I think this advice is good for any aspiring author with a ready manuscript – not just children’s books. What do you think?

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