Five entries shortlisted for the 2017 Crocodile Prize Chamber of Mines and Petroleum, Essays and Journalism Award

The 2017 Crocodile Prize Essays and Journalism Category received a collection of interesting topics that were written about and sent in. The topics varied greatly. Predictably, a good number of the entries were about Politics, Corruption, Power and Leadership. 2017 was the year of the Papua New Guinea National Elections and so the number of entries talking about this illustrated this. Congratulations to the 5 entries that were shortlisted for the 2017 Crocodile Prize, PNG Chamber of Mines and Petroleum, Essays and Journalism Category. The shortlisted entrants of the competition come with diverse backgrounds and experiences. Listed below are the titles and the names of entrants considered as winners.

 The Murder by Kepan Kepas Winuan
 The Positive Side of Men by Michael Geketa
 Lack of Readers and Buyers in Papua New Guinea by Jordan Dean
 Her Fight by Evah Kuamin Banige
 Doctors without Medical Borders by William Tau -Vali

The shortlisted literary entries above have been sent to the sponsors who have picked the overall winner. The overall winner will be announced at the Awards Reception event on the 17th February 2018, here in Port Moresby. The brief biographies below illustrate a little bit more about the shortlisted authors.

The Murder by Kepan Kepas Winuan

Kepan Kepas Winuan is a Teacher at the Kudjip Nazarene High School, Kudjip Nazarene Station, Jiwaka Province.

Kepan is currently working on publishing two books and a school magazine. These literary materials are; Book of Synonyms, Developing Writing Skills and School Journal.

Her first book (Book of Homonyms) has been completed. She is now negotiating with Notion Press Publishing Company of India to have it published.

The Positive Side of Men by Michael Geketa

Michael Geketa is employed in the informal economy in Port Moresby, National Capital District, after serving in the Royal Police Constabulary for much of his life. He used to contribute his written work to Kokomo Magazine at Kerevat National High School in 1989 as a student. He also contributed poems to the Weekly Writers Column poetry corner of the National Newspaper since 2009. The 2014 and 2015 Crocodile Prize Anthology included his work, four Poems and two Essays. He has started writing a book of poems and short story. Work has also began for a framework of his biography titled: Thun der over Parkinson Ranges

Lack of Readers and Buyers in Papua New Guinea by Jordan Dean

Jordan Dean works as a Director (until confirmed) of Grants Management Organisation in Port Moresby, NCD. He has been writing as a hobby for over a decade. Several of his poems and short stories have been published on international sites and magazines including: Power Poetry, Dissident Voice Magazine, Creative Talents Unleashed, Tuck Magazine, Micro Poetry, Story Write, Spill Words Literary Press and PNG Attitude.

Jordan has published 4 books: ‘Tattooed Face: A collection of Poems’ (2016), ‘Follow the Rainbow: Selected Poems’ (2016)), ‘Stranger in Paradise & other Short Stories’ (2016)) and ‘Silent Thoughts: Exploring Poetry’’ (2017)). These books are available on Amazon.

Her Fight by Evah Kuamin Banige

Evah Kuamin Banige is an Administration Officer in Lae, Morobe Province.
She is passionate about writing, helping children and advocating for change and development in her community. She wrote: ‘Victims of violence have to rise up and speak out for their own good. I believe I have taken the biggest step to write about my experiences as a woman facing violence through this competition’

She has been writing since her primary school days. She won a prize for the story of her experience of the 1994 Twin Volcanic Eruptions which was published in book of collection of short stories. Part of 4th Year Journalism Thesis was published in the South Pacific Islands Journalism Communication. One of her entry won the 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) Best Award in the Print Category of the PNG Media Awards.

Doctors Without Medical Borders by William Tau -Vali

William Tau-Vali
is a retired public servant who resides at his Motuan Village of Gaire, Central Province. His background is in computing. That’s the area he studied at University but he would like to think of himself these days as an emerging writer. This is his first written work, together with the other two pieces he submitted earlier in the 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition.

Judged 5 Best Poetry Entry for 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition

The following titles below are the 5 winners of the 2017 Crocodile Prize Kina Securities Poetry Category.

The short list of the winning entries came from a long process of filing, culling and judging. Only one more process is left, that is: Selection of the overall winner among the 5 winners as identified by the judges.

The winners for the 2017 Crocodile Prize Kina Securities Poetry Category are the following entries:
Broken and beaten by Leila Parina
He is gagged by Emmanuel Marosi
We need change by Annie Dori
When tomorrow come by Leiao Gerega
Who will by Leiao Gerega

Leila Parina wrote a candid and beautifully stringed group of words into a poetry illustrating violence by those who supposed to love. Leila has been writing since she was 9 years old. She mostly wrote in her private journals. Her first published work was out in 2017. It is called “A paradigm shift” which was featured in the PNG Anthology “My walk to Equality”.

Emmanuel Marosi put together firm and strong verses which was dedicated to Martyn Namorong, a Papua New Guinean Blogger and Anti-Corruption Activist. This was when members of public took to supporting Martyn during the Tomato Head saga. Emmanuel has published several articles on the internet, on blogs and other sites like hub pages. He has been writing since 2012. He is an electrical communications engineer.

Annie Dori weaves together a rather grim scene of situations in PNG that shows societies moving toward destitute and annihilation. The poem therefore calls for change. Annie is currently under the Ok Tedi’s Graduate Program as an Occupational Nursing Officer. She loves working with communities and is passionate about Humanitarian work. She only keeps entries in her private journal. She would not consider herself as a writer or a poet.

Leiao Gerega eloquently paints a crude and bleak world we live in, in the poem ‘Who will’. The question is who will. Her other poem speaks of violence in the most animated and colourful language. Two of her entries were selected by the Judge. Leiao is reporter with South Pacific Post Courier. She loves reading, writing short stories and poems. The shortlisted entry for this year and other poems have always been dedicated her my mother. She started writing as a 10-year-old. Her writings were mostly kept in her diaries. Her first ever published work of two poems are featured in the PNG women’s first Anthology ‘My Walk to Equality’.

Entry for the 2017 Crocodile Prize Kina Securities Poetry Category by Steven Mel.

Steven Mel is from Jiwaka and Simbu provinces. He has a Bachelor of Arts PNG Studies from the Divine Word University. Works in the area of Social Development more the Civil Society Sector.   He is an amateur writer who has been writing poetry since high school. He plans to get published in the future.

Clouds coloured conjuring,
Apparitions from mists descend
Mystical Asaro warriors;
Clay burdened figures, ghostly attired.
Through misty valleyed morns,
They stealthily steer,
Fluidity of fearful motions;
Educing entangled emotions.
Limbs, torsos earthen bleached,
Muscles flexed, caked in clay.
Merciless masks of troublesome terror,
Mudmen stalk in spooky splendour.
Bamboo pincers; arrows poised,
Arms swept, weightlessly swirled.
Wondrous imagery; ageless mystery,
Of Ancient Asaro pedigree.
Walking hitherto in pilgrimage,
Vintage regalia and primal norms.
Ancestral legacies,
A thousand years borne.
Enshrouded in clay,
The world has known,
Of mud soaked men
In spiritual trance.
Identities envisaged,
A people’s pride;
When the mudmen’s bilas
Evokes his ghastly dance.

Dear Hope

Edited for the Blog from the entries for 2017 Crocodile Prize Competition, Kina Securities Poetry Category by Caroline Evari

Caroline Evari is from Musa in Oro and Waema in Milne Bay. Caroline has been writing since she was 7. Caroline’s short Story was published in the Walk to Equality Anthology.  She has a blog titled “Everyday Battles”, https://carolineevari.wordpress.com

Dear Hope

 

Where are you?

The nights are getting colder

The days are getting hotter

The rivers are drying up

The green is becoming dust

 

Can you hear my cry?

I am a mother unloved

I am a lost child

And I am an abandoned child

Why have you forgotten me hope?

 

My dreams are slipping away

Hold my hand, walk with me

Embrace me, comfort me

Rejuvenate me to endure this life

Do you not hear my distress?

 

On my weak and weary feet

I call upon you to come forth

Feel my weary shaky hands

I am reaching out to you

 

Hope my long lost friend

I need you more than ever before

Dance and sing with me in the rain

Laugh with me joyfully through the seasons

Come forth hope, come forth

The woman

Edited version of an Entry for the 2017 Crocodile Prize Kina Securities Poetry Category by Lo’rence Arisa Evera.   Lo’rence is a Grade 11, Sogeri National High School student here in Papua New Guinea.  This literary piece is a dedication to his mother and a matriarch of the family and tribe and a fighter against the battle of Cancer.

 

The Woman

 

She walks around with her head held high

Always with a smile on her face

A personality that younger women pursue

And humour that is contagious

 

 

Her children call her ‘the tiger’

And she lives up to that name

Her furry and rage no one can tame

Her love as ferocious

 

She has cried a lot

She has pained a lot

A grim battle she continues to fight

 

Her charismatic aura canvases her journey

In the privacy of her room to her God she kneels

With prayers for courage and hope

To be a better mother, sister and wife, and for life

 

Prayers complete and her smile lightens up the road she travels

Her journey continues

We dwell in her love

Message From Chairman

Greetings everyone, and welcome back to the Crocodile Prize Blog and Home.

We are excited to launch The Crocodile Prize Competition 2017, but not just yet.

Before we launch, we will announce the 2016 Competition winners. The official Crocodile Prize 2016 Award Ceremony will be held on the 16th of February at the Australian High Commission Grounds, Port Moresby, NCD.

We are excited that we were able to select the winners using a very rigorous and a transparent process of culling and then judging. We believe our highlight for 2016 would have been institutionalising INTEGRITY into our systems and process of administering the Crocodile Prize in Papua New Guinea. Having registered a legal entity to operate under gives Crocodile Prize a strong platform to stand on for future years. The committee has also secured two major sponsors, Kina (K10,000) and SP Holdings (K10,000) and we have introduced “Emerging Young Writer Award”, sponsored by Abt & Associate. You will also be pleased to know that we will have three prize winners from each category – not just one.  As of today, we have all the winners identified from the eight categories.  The categories and their sponsors are:

Kina –Poetry

SP Holdings Ltd – Illustrations

Abt and Associate-Emerging Young Writer

PNG Chamber of Mines and Petroleum – Essay and Journalism

Kumul Petroleum Holding – Short Stories

Paga Hill Development – Writing for Children

Cleland Family – Heritage Writing

MRDC –Women in Writing

We will start announcing the Short Story winners tomorrow and will continue with all the categories each day on this blog. All winners will be contacted directly by the committee.

Next week, Crocodile Prize representatives will be on the NBC radio to talk about the the competition.  Please tune in to listen to winners, judges and committee members speak about the 2016 competition and this year’s launching.

We would like to sincerely thank all our sponsors for their support.

Thank you writers and friends of Crocodile Prize.  Let’s make 2017 a big year. Write those stories!  – Chairman, Emmanuel Peni.

How To Write A Poem

HOW  TO  WRITE  A  POEM – Chips Mackellar

The first task is to plan what you want to say.

For example, suppose you wanted to decide if your old uncle is too old to do something.  Would he be too old because he has grey hair? No, because lots of people have grey hair and can do things. What about if he has bad teeth? No, because lots of people have bad teeth but can still do things. So what would make him too old?  Well he would be too old if he thought he could do something then found that he was too old to do it.

So you could put your plan into verse, like this:

He’s not too old when his hair turns grey,

He’s not too old when his teeth decay.

But he’s well on his way to his last long sleep,

When his mind makes a date which his body can’t keep.

The essence of a good poem is if its end of lines rhyme, and the lines which rhyme have the same number of syllables. So, analyse the poem, to see if it rhymes, and count the number of syllables per line.

Total

Syllables

Per line

|

Line                      Number the  syllables per line

 

  1. He’s / not/ too/ old/ when / his / hair/ turns/ grey.
  • 2     3     4      5        6       7      8         9                                       total: 9

 

  1. He’s / not / too/ old / when / his/  teeth / de/
  • 2       3      4        5          6        7     8     9                                             total; 9

 

  1. But /  he’s /  well /  on  /  his  /  way  /  to  /  his / last /  long / sleep,

1      2       3         4        5        6        7       8      9       10       11                   total: 11

 

  1. When /  his /  mind /  makes / a /  date /  which /  his /  body/  can’t/  keep

1          2       3           4        5      6          7         8       9          10       11.    total: 11

 

So you can see that the end of lines 1 and 2 rhyme (grey with decay) and the end of lines 3 and 4 rhyme (sleep with keep) and the rhyming lines have the same number of syllables.

In this example each word has only one syllable except in Line 2 where “decay” has two syllables thus: “de / cay.”

Easy. Isn’t it?

                                                                                                                 Chips Mackellar enjoys writing poetry and has volunteered to help Papua New Guinean who wish to improve their poetry.

[ Note: The poem here is an old maxim of uncertain origin, used here as an example of how to turn prose into poetry]

Poems from Emily that Chips made some suggestions to and as requested by Emily. (Emily’s original unedited poems have been entered in Crocodile Prize 2016).

GLAMOUROUSLY COLOURFUL  1.

Wings so big and feathers so bright,

With plumes outstretched to my delight,

King of birds and colourful too,

Glamourous and bold, we all love you.

Papua New Guinea’s symbolic device,

Our beautiful Bird of Paradise.

STAR SO BRIGHT   2.

Grant me my wish oh star so bright,

In peace and harmony tonight,

That I may not perish in thy sight,

But live and flourish with delight.

A LOVER’S WISH   3.

If our moon should ever fade away,

And the sun dies out and dark our day,

I wish our love be bold and grand,

And linger long in another land,

And never ever fail or stall,

Even if the stars should fall.

The Witch Hunt – Poetry

A poem by llyana Garap

witch_photo_1
Enter a caption

Courtesy Tom Lee via Flickr / Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/qW8iEj

 

Witch Hunt

 

Please stop!

You’re hurting me, please stop I cried

I’m sorry that your brother died.

Your brother was my son, you see,

So stop this pain. You’re hurting me.

I’m sorry that your father died,

He was my husband, at my side.

He was so old, he could not walk,

He even found it hard to talk.

I’m sorry that your daughter died.

In God’s own hand she’ll now abide.

She was my grandchild, dear to me,

I would not harm her, don’t you see.

I did not kill them, that is true.

Please ask God, and he’ll tell you.

You come into my kunai house,

And drag me out, as cat drags mouse,

You burn me with an iron so hot,

Took all the strength that I have got.

You cut my skin with sharpened knife

You’ve tried so hard to end my life.

You destroy my house, which is my home.

I’m doomed forever, now to roam.

I’m not sanguma, pointing bone,

Please go now. Leave me alone!!!!!!

 

This is another example of a writer’s poem that has been assisted by Chips. If you need some help with yours, please send your work to crocprize@gmail.com

We also would like to publish some stories, poems and photographs associated with literature in PNG. All contributions will be considered with feedback for the writer.